WORKSHOP 3: EVERYONE IS DIFFERENT

Appreciating Diversity of Emotional Responses

SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING CATEGORY

Social Awareness

PURPOSE

  • Perspective taking
  • Respect for Others
  • Empathy

OBJECTIVE

Goal: Students become aware that people can emotionally respond to the same event in different ways, and that’s OK.

Using an online activity to spur discussion, teacher emphasizes how people can have different emotional responses to the same event and that’s OK. Students use drama games to role-play and then create a drawing or writing to demonstrate understanding.

MATERIALS

Classroom Equipment

  • Technical set-up (Internet connection, white board, projector and space to project)
  • Crayons, pencils, tape, glue
  • Blank 8.5x11 white paper

Emotional ABCs Program

Online Resources
  • Everyone is Different Path: Top Tabs > Lesson List > Unit 1, Lesson 3, Everyone is Different
  • Picture Game Path: Top Tabs > Lesson List > Unit 2, Lesson 1, Picture Game
PDFs

CONNECTIONS

May connect to these Common Core Standards:

Language Arts: Writing

CCSS.ELA-Literacy W.K.3

CCSS.ELA-Literacy W.1.3

CCSS.ELA-Literacy W.2.3

Language Arts: Language

CCSS.ELA-Literacy L.K.4, L.K.5

CCSS.ELA-Literacy L.1.4, L.1.5

CCSS.ELA-Literacy L.2.4, L.2.5

Language Arts: Speaking & Listening

CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.K.1, SL.K.4, SL.K.5

CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.1.1, SL.1.4, SL.1.5

CCSS.ELA-Literacy SL.2.1, SL.2.4, SL.2.5

WARM UP

  • Introduce Topic: Play Online Activity, Everyone is Different Path: Top Tabs > Lesson List > Unit 1, Lesson 3, Everyone is Different
  • Reiterate Topic: Emphasize that different people can have different emotional responses to the same thing.
  • Elicit Personal Responses: Play Online Activity, Picture Game. Ask students for their personal responses to the activity. Path: Top Tabs > Lesson List > Unit 2, Lesson 1, Picture Game

MINI-LESSON

  • Teaching Point: “Last session, we observed that we did not all respond the same way to the music, and that’s OK. Just now, we had different responses to the pictures. People, even your friends and family, might have different emotional responses to the same event than you. Respecting other people’s feelings is important. It is equally important to trust your own emotional feelings, even if you feel differently about an event than everyone else.”
  • Students Discuss Differences: Students talk with friends to understand they may feel differently than their friends about situations and that’s OK.

ACTIVITY

  • Role Play in Scenarios to Practice Empathy: Using Drama Cue Cards PDF, students observe different reactions to the same stimuli, then practice empathic responses by asking questions.

    The Drama Cue Cards guide students through the Process of: #1 The Situation; #2 The Response; #3 Asking Why; #4 BECAUSE; #5 I Understand.

SHARE-OUT

  • Discuss Responses to Role-Playing Activity
  • Summarize. “We’ve demonstrated how the same situation can create different emotional responses. People have personal reasons for their emotional responses.”

SELF-REFLECTION

TEACHING TOOL: Tech - Online Presentation, Discussion

GOAL: Children learn that people can react differently to the same event, and that’s OK.

PREPARATION

  • Locate Online Activity, Everyone is Different Path: Top Tabs > Lesson List > Unit 1, Lesson 3, Everyone is Different
  • Locate Online Activity, Picture Game Path: Top Tabs > Lesson List > Unit 2, Lesson 1, Picture Game

TEACHER DOES

Play Online Activity, Everyone is Different using your classroom techniques to proceed through the activity. Path: Top Tabs > Lesson List > Unit 1, Lesson 3, Everyone is Different

TEACHER SAYS

“I noticed that the people in the activity had different emotional responses to the same situation. Let’s try another activity and see how each of us responds.”

TEACHER DOES

  1. Multiple Correct Answers: Before starting the Picture Game Activity, bring student attention to the Multiple Correct Answer icon, top right of the activity. Explain that there can be more than one correct answer because people can feel differently about the same thing.
  2. Play Picture Game. Ask students to choose an answer by raising their hand. Narrate an approximate tally of class responses for each screen as you proceed through the activity. For example, “For this picture, we have 10 Exciteds, 2 Calms, and 7 Scareds.” Path: Top Tabs > Lesson List > Unit 2, Lesson 1, Everyone is Different

TEACHING TOOL: Discussion

GOAL: Students notice they may feel differently about events than their friends and that’s OK. Students learn to respect other people’s feelings and to respect and trust their own emotional responses.

PREPARATION

  • Read scripts below to develop your own approach. The goals are to build a foundation for increased empathy (respect for others) and to combat peer pressure (respect for self).

TEACHING POINT

“Last session, we observed that we did not all respond the same way to the music and that’s OK. Just now, we had different responses to the pictures. People, even your friends and family, might have different emotional responses to the same event than you. Respecting other people’s feelings is important. It is equally important to trust your own emotional feelings, even if you feel differently about an event than everyone else.”

MODEL

Give an example that resonates with you and your class. “For example, I like strawberries but my friend, Lisa, thinks they smell bad! It’s OK with me that she feels differently than I do about strawberries because we have fun together and care for each other.”

FACILITATE STUDENT TO STUDENT INTERACTION

  1. Group your class into friendship groups of 2 or 3.
  2. Ask students, “Sit next to 2-3 friends. Find two things that you feel differently about even though you are friends. For example, talk about favorite foods, colors, games, or sports that you might feel differently about.”

RESTATE TEACHING POINT + STUDENT INPUT

TEACHER SAYS

(Choose 1-2 groups.) Ex: “Tell me 2 things that you and and your friends feel differently about.”

Ex: “I noticed that you can be friends with people even if they feel differently about many situations than you.”

TEACHING TOOL: Small Groups - Discussion and Scenarios

GOAL: Students role-play an emotional response to a Scenario, demonstrating that there can be many plausible emotional responses to the same situation.

PREPARATION

  • Students stay in the small friend groups established earlier.
  • Print 1 set of Drama Cue Cards PDF. You will be creating short scenarios in which children will narrate and act on cue. Then, you will lead a class discussion to create a BECAUSE statement.
  • Create a short list of ‘secret’ emotion words. You will be telling a few students a ‘secret’ emotion word and asking them to act as if they feel that emotion. (Examples: Happy, Bored, Scared, Worried, etc.)

TEACHER SAYS (Demonstration)

“We are going to imagine reasons why people might have different emotional reactions to the same situation. Let me demonstrate the activity.”

  1. Display Drama Cue Card #1 - The Situation: First, you will hear The Narrator explain The Situation. For example, “The class is going on a field trip to the park.”
  2. Display Drama Cue Card #2 - The Act: Next, The Actor will respond in a physical way that matches a secret emotion word. For example, the Actor will say, “Yeah, I know.” [Demonstrate with low energy.] “The Actor does not say the ‘secret emotion word.’”
  3. Display Drama Cue Card #3 - Why: Then, The Friend will ask, “Why did you respond like that?”
  4. Display Drama Cue Card #4 - BECAUSE: Finally, you will talk in your small group to imagine a BECAUSE statement and be ready to tell the class. For example, ‘Maybe he felt disappointed BECAUSE he enjoys music class. If they go to the park, he will miss music.”
  5. (Optional) Display Drama Cue Card #5 - I Understand: Time allowing and if appropriate for your class, you can use this card to expand the conversation. Ex. “I understand. I know you like music. It must be disappointing to miss your favorite class.”

TEACHER DOES (This time, students take on the roles with teacher support, teacher holds up the Drama Cards.)

  1. Display Drama Card #1 - The Situation: Choose a student, ask them to stand up and tell the class The Situation, “We Are going on a field trip to the park.”
  2. Display Drama Card #2 - The Act: Choose a student, whisper a new secret emotion word to them, and have them ‘act out’ the emotional response without naming it, i.e. ‘Excited’ or Scared, Worried, Mad, etc.
  3. Display Drama Card #3 - Why: Choose a student, ask them to stand up and say, “Why did you respond that way?”
  4. Display Drama Card #4 - BECAUSE: Ask students to talk with their small groups. Each group will develop a BECAUSE sentence that includes the emotion they think the actor is feeling. Choose 1-2 groups to give their BECAUSE sentences and guide the conversation to support the Actor’s emotion.
  5. (Optional:) Display Drama Card #5 - I Understand: Choose a student to give an “I Understand” response.
  6. Repeat the process several times, using the same Situation (i.e., “We are going on a field trip to the park,”) but changing out the ‘secret emotion word’ and calling on different students for different roles. The goal is to demonstrate different emotional responses to the same situation and imagine plausible reasons for the response.

Optional ‘Situations’ examples:

  • “We have a special guest today who will show us a new dance.”
  • “Because it is raining today, we will stay inside during recess.”

TEACHING TOOL: All Share/Groups

GOAL: Students review the concept of different responses to the same event.

TEACHER DOES

  • Encourage conversation about the Activity. Ex: “Does anyone want to talk about different emotional responses to the same event?”
  • Summarize. Ex: “We’ve demonstrated how people may have different emotional responses to the same situation. People have personal reasons for their emotional responses.”

Optional Extended Conversation

  • Ex: “What if you go to a park that has a giant slide. All of your friends go down it and keep asking you to do it with them, but you don’t want to. What can you do?”
  • Ex: “What if the roles are reversed. You LOVE the giant slide but your friend says, ‘No’ every time you ask him to do it. What can you do?”
  • Ex: “Let’s talk about the importance of asking “Why?” in order to understand someone’s emotional response.”

TEACHING TOOL: Free Form PDF

GOAL: Children recognize that they may have different emotional responses to the same situation than friends, family, or other people, and that’s OK.

PREPARATION

TEACHER SAYS (Self-Reflection Options)

Ex: “Draw/write about something from our lesson today that you felt differently about than your friends.”

Ex: “Talk to a friend and find something you feel differently about than your friend. Write/draw about it. For example, “My favorite color is blue, but my friend feels bored by the color blue. Her favorite color is orange.”

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